The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) successfully launched its mega rocket — the GSLV Mark III, which put the GSAT-19 satellite into orbit.

The mega rocket GSLV-Mark III lifted off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre on Monday at 7:59 a.m. Eastern. Some reports indicated that the rocket was performing as planned though satellite separation.

After the 640-tonne rocket lifted off, scientists were very cheerful and embraced each other.

So, for India, this is the very first launch of this powerful, variant of the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle. The U.S., Russia, Europe, China, and Japan are already there.

The rocket’s payload was the GSAT-19 communications satellite.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi posted on his Twitter account: “The GSLV – MKIII D1/GSAT-19 mission takes India closer to the next generation launch vehicle and satellite capability.”

The new rocket carried a powerful engine that has been developed in India over many years.

The GSLV Mk III rocket carried a satellite weighing more than three tonnes into a high orbit above Earth. A landmark achievement as India had struggled to match the heavier payloads of other space giants.

“They just launched the most powerful engine in India. It is a cryogenic engine, which took them 20 years to develop. Some engineers have spent their life working on this,” Mathieu Weiss, a representative in India for France’s space agency CNES, told AFP.

A representative in India for France’s space agency CNES, Mathieu Weiss told AFP: “They just launched the most powerful engine in India. It is a cryogenic engine, which took them 20 years to develop. Also, some engineers have spent their life working on this.”

ISRO is also reviewing the idea of future missions to Jupiter and Venus.