We live in our lovely home, Earth, which spins on its axis and revolves around the Sun. Our star orbits in an ellipse around the center of the Milky Way and everything is moving through space.

The Milky Way is on a collision course with another galaxy. Our galaxy is being pulled towards the Andromeda within our local group. The latter is being pushed around inside our cosmic supercluster, Laniakea, by galactic groups, clusters, and cosmic voids, which itself lies in the KBC void amidst the large-scale structure of the Universe.

An accurate model of how the planets orbit the Sun, which then moves through the galaxy in a different direction-of-motion. Image credit: Rhys Taylor of http://www.rhysy.net/, via his blog at http://astrorhysy.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/and-yet-it-moves-but-not-like-that.html.

An accurate model of how the planets orbit the Sun, which then moves through the galaxy in a different direction-of-motion. Image credit: Rhys Taylor of rhysy.net, via his blog.

Even our Sun is not in a static position. Our whole massive Milky Way is in motion. Affected by its net gravity, all the stars, planets, gas clouds, dust grains, black holes, dark matter and more move around inside of it.

Is there any static object in the Universe?

To make it more clear, since the big bang exploded, the whole universe is expanding in an accelerating mode. Basically, every object in the universe is moving away from each other.

Some 25,000 light years from the galactic center, the Sun speeds around in an ellipse. Thus, making a complete revolution once every 220–250 million years or so. An interesting fact is that last time we were at this point in our galaxy where we now stand, dinosaurs were roaming Earth.

Researchers say that Sun’s speed is around 200–220 km/s along this journey.

Not just our solar system, but the galaxy itself isn’t stationary but rather moves due to the gravitational attraction of all the overdense matter clumps and, equally, due to the lack of gravitational attraction from all of the underdense regions.

Within our local group, we can measure our speed towards the largest, massive galaxy in our cosmic backyard: Andromeda. It appears to be moving towards our Sun at a speed of 301 km/s, which means —when we factor in the motion of the Sun through the Milky Way — that the local group’s two most massive galaxies, Andromeda and the Milky Way, are heading towards each other at a speed of around 109 km/s.